Monday, 07 December 2009 04:07

Shoes for the Children of the Amazons

On November 18, 2009 the Hope Movement received a generous donation in the amount of $1,111.89 from a local church in Maryland for the purchase of shoes for our children in our outreach centers in the Amazon city of Iquitos, Peru which is currently serving over 200 children. Marta Noguera, the program director and Pastor of the Luz de las Naciones (Light of the Nations) Church in Annapolis, Maryland sent the funds to our center director, and on Saturday, December 5, 2009 the centers director Graciela de Flores went to the market in Iquitos, and came into contact with a store who had enough shoes for all of the children, and offered us a discount since we are purchasing many pairs of shoes. Because of this discount we will have some extra funds to have a beautiful Christmas Children's Party bringing joy and love to children who have faced difficult times in their short time on this earth, opening their eyes to their potential and the love of God.

Friday, 21 October 2016 03:52

Shaking The Comfort Zone

Fatherless, Motherless, Hopeless the result of selfishness. Longing for a loving caress. Drowning in the abyss of society’s lack of knowledge that I exist. Imagine you in my place, the result of human disgrace. 100,000,000 like me. More slavery now than in history. In the U.S. alone 50,000 women and children are trafficked annually. They abide where you reside. But you never heard their cry. This is an emergency for a movement of hope. Psychological contamination fed into the blood stream from generation to generation. Family disintegration. The definition of family in a state of disintegration. But there is a hope for family reconciliation. Impoverished souls, in impoverished conditions. Self medication suffering from hope malnutrition. The face of racism changed from segregation to immigration. But there is a hope for the purification of the heart pollution. 

 

Thursday, 09 September 2010 03:46

Joann Kidwell, Woman of Intense Faith

Joann Kidwell was a woman of intense faith in God. From her birth she had to faced horrific obstacles, but her strength led her through the storms of life to become a woman of example to everyone she came in contact with. Joann was born with cerebral palsy, and was abandoned by her parents at a young age. Raised by her aunt she grew up with physical difficulties and deep rooted pain from the lack of love by those around her, but she rose from the ashes of despair, reaching out to her Heavenly Father who became her everything in life.

Wednesday, 19 October 2016 03:42

RECALL NOTICE:

The Maker of all human beings (GOD) is recalling all units manufactured, regardless of make or year, due to a serious defect in the primary and central component of the heart.

 

 

This is due to a malfunction in the original prototype units code named Adam and Eve, resulting in the reproduction of the same defect in all subsequent units. This defect has been technically termed "Sub-sequential Internal Non-morality," or more commonly known as S.I.N., as it is primarily expressed.

It is estimated that over 1.5 million people from the United States participate in short-term mission trips every year. That is a lot of people. And those 1.5 million people spend close to $2 billion for these trips.

 

My husband and I live in Guatemala and host short-term mission teams throughout the year. I am originally from California and he was born and raised in Guatemala. For me, short-term mission trips were kind of like camp. Every summer I had the chance to go somewhere new and “help people.” For my husband, hosting short-term mission teams in Guatemala was part of what he and his family did. There were blessings that came from it, but it was mostly a lot of work.

 

 

We have both seen the good, the bad and the ugly of short-term missions. And we continue to feel this tension with the short-term mission teams that we host. Do they do more harm than good? Do they perpetuate the cycle of poverty? Do they contribute to feelings of superiority? Or inferiority? Our work with families and communities in Guatemala, as well as churches and schools from the U.S. has forced us to ask these questions daily.

Saturday, 28 February 2015 03:21

February 2015 Guatemala Trip

On February 11, 2015 I arrived in Guatemala at around 2:30 p.m. greeted by our passionate team and precious friends. We traveled to a local church in Guatemala City where we received 5 new water purification systems. The following day we drove about an hour to Palin to evaluate a potential new Hope Movement church-based feeding/ education center. You enter into this town with rundown cement buildings and unpaved roads and there you find a church like a lighthouse in troubled waters. We entered the church greeted by the Pastor and over 70 children who were reciting Bible scriptures. The children were well behaved and attentive to the Pastor’s words. While Pastor Neri shared a story about building your life on the rock and not the sand, the Pastor of this church came to me. He shared with me that these children come from a section of the city that is hidden, a mini city of houses made of rusted metal, nylon and cardboard. No electricity, no water, and no sanitation. He said that this feeding center will often be the only nutritious meal they will have all week. He shared from his heart how he is burdened for this community but has felt abandoned; he has felt alone in carrying this weight on his shoulders, until today when The Hope Movement family walked through the doors. I told him you are not alone, you were never abandoned and a new day has arrived for we are forever united. We then shared the vision with the children and their families, sang songs, prayed and had a simple but delicious lunch with the children. After the activities concluded I asked the Pastor if we can visit the community where these children live. We walked down a narrow alley and behind the cement building were a mini city of metal houses and mud filled streets. Rows of these houses on each side an impactful sight to behold and all of these children live here along with over 500 families. These are the people this feeding/ education center will impact; these are the ones whose lives will be transformed by the awesome power and love of Jesus Christ.

In 2008 Pastor William Obando contacted Jonathan Roiz, Founder of The Hope Movement regarding the construction of a church building and feeding center in San SebastìanSan Josè, Costa Rica which is part of an area called Moravia. They had been using a tent for 6 years for their church meetings and feeding center and were in urgent need to build a roof for the church building. After much prayer The Hope Movement was able send the needed funds to complete the construction. Today this church has a large congregation and community outreach helping hundreds of people throughout the community. 

In 2009 a social worker from Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service was referred to Jonathan Roiz, founder of The Hope Movement to assist in reconnecting Mauricio an immigrant boy from Mexico would was displaced and being deported. They were in search for his family so that he is not deported to the dangerous streets of his home town of Reynosa. Jonathan began his detailed search for connections in Mexico and on the boarder. Through a difficult search God lead him to some pastors who lived near the boarder and were willing to travel to Reynosa to search for the boys family. Pastor Jose Iglesias with Grace Lutheran Church in Arlington, Texas was able to get in contact with the community and obtain phone numbers for the minor's family, which were passed along to the facility where Mauricio was being held. The social worker met with the minor and he informed her that he was able to speak with his family.

 

These are common acts of compassion that take place through The Hope Movement behind the scenes. Often humbly taken on without many even knowing it except for God. This is our heart, to answer God's call and be willing to say send me I'll go.

Located in the Amazon city of Iquitos, Peru our Reaching Children for Jesus program is one of the only outreach programs in Iquitos, Peru, providing weekly nutritious meals to the most vulnerable of children in the community, children who most days live on less than a piece of bread a day, and spend their time in the streets begging and searching for food for their families. Children live in wooden huts on stilts located above the Amazon River and are transported from their home to our center by canoe. A nutritious meal is essential for survival and development. In attending the program the Hope Movement does not just provide physical nourishment, but through education and counseling we provide spiritual and emotional nourishment to guide children, heal their inner wounds, and inspire them to pursue their life’s purpose, understanding that poverty is not their destiny, it is only an obstacle to overcome to make their dreams into a reality. 

In 2004 The Hope Movement answered the cries of God's servants, Pastor Brando Molina and his beautiful wife, and 4 children. At that time their three boys were 14, 12 ,and 10 years old and their little girl is 6 years old. They are Pastors' of a small church in El Salvador with a passion to bring a positive change within their communities. In taking on this responsibility of helping others they have had to suffer many hardships. Because of heavy rains and poor construction of their roof water was pouring into their home. The items in their home were bring destroyed such as furniture, clothing, and items that reflect their memories. Because of the water pouring into the home, the children became sick, but they had no money to take them to the Doctors, nor did they have the money to provide basic meals to keep their fragile bodies strong.

 

With the help of Marta Noguera we obtained donations to help build a roof for the Molina family and provide needed supplies which were destroyed by the rain.